Appalachian Jamwich TAUKs about Isaac

Appalachian Jamwich put together a nice highlight on Isaac, calling him “arguably the most physical drummer currently gracing the stage if not the most stylistically animated.”  They talk about his role as the drummer in TAUK and some of the side projects he’s been working on. The piece is part of a series running up to our tour in 2016 with Umphrey’s Mcgee. You can read all about here

http://www.appalachianjamwich.com/2015/12/01/taco-bout-it-tauko-bout-tauk-isaac-teel/

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Mountain Xpress

Smart Bets: TAUK

an article from Mountain Xpress
by Kat McReynolds December 9, 2014

Forget hibernating. Instrumental rockers TAUK are making a full-fledged national tour this winter, and Asheville fans have two chances to catch the band live. TAUK, oft-praised for its ability to infuse songs with emotional cues despite the absence of lyrics, plays New Mountain this week before circling back to Asheville as the supporting act for an Umphrey’s McGee performance at the U.S. Cellular Center in February. According to the band’s website, the New York state-based quartet’s latest 10-song album, Collisions, “spans delicate ethereal textures, highly imaginatively funky drumming, labyrinthine arrangements and fiery solos” — certainly the kind of thing one could bear to hear twice. Local jam band Makayan opens for TAUK and headliner Dopapod (dance rock) at New Mountain on Thursday, Dec. 11, at 9 p.m. $12 advance/$15 day of show. newmountainavl.com.

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The Musical Bean

Let’s Talk About TAUK

An interview with The Musical Bean
December 1, 2014

Grown out of Oyster Bay, New York, this four piece band of brothers are on the rise, and it’s only time till you catch them live. With Isaac Teel lockin’ down drum set, Alric “A.C.” Carter slingin’ keys, Charlie Dolan phunkin’ down the bass line, and Matt Jalbert stirrin’ it all up on guitar, the boys bring the beat. Having just released their third studio album, Collisions, this past July, and pairing up tours with some of the most legendary funk and jam groups on the scene today, TAUK is on the run to take over, and are already doing so.

I recently had the special opportunity to interview TAUK around the time of their last Boston show when they opened for The New Mastersound’s at Brighton Music Hall this past September. Discussing their new album, “Collisions”, artistic viewpoints, inspirations and more, let’s take a peek at what the boys had to say:

MB: Ya’ll just dropped a fresh new album, titled Collisions, this year working alongside producer, Robert Carranza, who’s worked with artists like Jack Johnson and Mars Volta and more. How was your experience working with him on the album? What direction has this album brought you all musically in compared to previous released albums? Who else would you like to work alongside within the future if given the right opportunity?

MJ: We’ve worked with Robert a lot in the past and he’s become a big part of our band. It’s rare to find somebody who you connect with so well on your music so our relationship with him helps our band grow a lot. He really knows our music and how to capture it in the best way. Collisions is definitely the next step for us. We’ve taken a lot of what we were doing in the past and focused it in. For me, this album is the best representation of what we do in a live setting that we’ve put out so far, but also with a few extra touches that we were able to add through the studio.

MB: Musicians relationships with music are constantly evolving, being influenced, challenged and compromised. Complex but addictive, everyone’s journey takes unexpected turns. Have you as a group taken any spontaneous unseen turns? How do you approach and handle these changes?

AC: Currently the biggest turn we’ve taken is the amount of shows we’ve added to our tour schedule. We’re planning to finish this year having played approximately 175 shows so days at home are few and far between. This has been an adjustment for us but we couldn’t be more excited as we continue to figure out the best way to tour. Playing shows and traveling is what we signed up for.

MB: Relationships within the band can be half the challenge of achieving success. Do you guys make sure of a healthy band flow? If so how do you approach this part of being a band? 

AC: One of the greatest things about being in this band is there’s no egos. We understand what it takes to achieve our goals within this band and realized a long time ago that bickering and fighting is simply distracting. Having a healthy dynamic between people you see over 200 days a year is a must. Keep honest and have patience with each other!

MB: Ya’ll have been guest performing and collaborating with a wide selection of talented artists over the past few years. Who are some of your favorite artists you’ve paired up with? Artists you wish to work with in the future?

AC: Karl Denson has sat in with us on more than a few occasions, which was simply awesome. It’s humbling to have someone who we respect and is established in our scene want play music with us. We’ve had other fantastic collaborations/sit-ins with Craig Brodhead (Turkuaz), Ron Holloway (Gov’t Mule), Rob Compa (Dopapod), Corey Henry (Snarky Puppy), and Robert Randolph. In the future we’d love link up with Flying Lotus, Lettuce, Umphrey’s McGee, and Derek Trucks to name a few.

MB: Any new upcoming bands in the scene that you guys admire currently?

AC: There’s a few so I’ll just list them: Snarky Puppy, Deaf Scene, The Nth Power, Consider The Source.

MB: Almost done: The music industry has been rapidly evolving over the past several decades. How do you feel about the current state of the industry? Anything you hope will change in the future? 

MJ: From what we can tell, the industry looks like its been shaken up and will continue to change. It’s a very interesting time to be involved with music because right now there’s no one right way of doing things. The door is open for bands to try different things. Different ways of promoting themselves or releasing their music. We’re always thinking of ways to get the word out about the band and realize that things may never stop changing. You just have to stay on your toes and constantly be looking out for the new thing.

MB: Last question: Each of you, you’re dirty pleasure artist/band to listen to! 

Isaac- Anita Baker

Matt- Spin Doctors

Charlie- Dio

AC- Boyz II Men

Full of fire and a bright future ahead of them, TAUK stands out as one of the grooviest upcoming bands in the funk scene today. With three studio albums under the belt and more to come, TAUK is walking into the prime of their career. Currently on tour with Dopapod, TAUK continues to pair up with jam and funk greats. Including upcoming shows with Dopapod, The Disco Biscuits, Umphrey’s McGee and Soule Monde, TAUK is staking down their ground.

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Broward/Palm Beach New Times

TAUK Launches Florida Tour With Blowout Jam at Funky Biscuit

TAUK

An article and Q&A from Broward/Palm Beach Times
By Derek Heid, Nov 7th 2014

I remember being in a car with a friend and hearing this entrancing music and both of us having the “Who is this? And why the hell don’t I know it yet?” moment. We looked at the display screen and saw the name TAUK and instantly devoted ourselves as new fans.

It seems to be the common reaction. When I play it in any new group, someone’s bound to ask the same questions. And the answer is, TAUK is a four-piece instrumental postrock, electronic, funk, jam band hailing from New York that is currently taking the jam scene by storm.

It’s a well-oiled machine that packed Funky Biscuit last night. The foursome demonstrated an astounding set of skills. It manages to stay tight while taking its sound into insane directions. The audience pretty much hung on every note.

As good as its original songs were, and damn, were they ever, some covers the band did kind of knocked me on my ass, like Tomoyasu Hotei’s “Battle Without Honor or Humanity” (from the movie Kill Bill and everything that parodies it). The band also did an amazing version of “Immigrant Song” that had the entire place nonstop movin’ and groovin’. It was one of the best jams shows I’ve ever attended.

I spoke with bassist Charlie Dolan about the formation of the band, what they’ve learned, and some things he’s looking forward to in TAUK’s Florida run.

The band is playing the 1904 Music Hall in Jacksonville tonight with the Fritz and Herd of Watts, Dunedin Brewery in Tampa on November 8, Davinci’s Café in Deland on November 13, and finally two sets at the Bear Creek Music Festival in Live Oak which takes place November 13 to 16.

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Village Voice’s “Best Jam Band New York 2014”

Best Jam Band New York 2014 – TAUK

An award and article from Village Voice
October 15, 2014

TAUK is a dirty, funky foursome whose just-released album Collisions is like a long-form math equation we don’t quite understand all the time — but when we do, it makes us feel smarter for having figured it out. “We took the things we liked from the last record and expanded on them,” guitarist and main TAUK-er Matt Jalbert says of the album. “There’s more texture, more groove….We’ve grown a lot since our last release, and this album is a really great snapshot of where we are now as a band.” Where they are now, much like on prior releases, is instrumental and deeply groove-oriented. But now there’s a little more progressive rock thrown in with the Phish food — a touch more melodic fusion. That’s due in part to Grammy-winning producer Robert Carranza (Mars Volta, Jack Johnson), whose hand (and expert ears) helped guide Collisions into an album that captures the essence of Tauk’s much-heralded and entrancing live shows.

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The Daily Times

No words needed: Prog rockers in TAUK communicate in soundscapes

An article from The Daily Times
by Steve Wildsmith August 20, 2014

The guys in TAUK communicate wordlessly.

They four-piece prog-rock outfit, which performs a free show at The Concourse in Knoxville next Thursday, Aug. 28, has mastered the art of silent communication in much the same way that romantic soulmates do, those couples that can say volumes with an upturned eyebrow or a crooked smile or a slow-lidded wink.

With guitar, bass, keyboard and drums, they weave masterful individual compositions back and forth, around one another’s separate parts to create a complex and complete piece of music as fine as Oriental silk stitched together by Ming Dynasty craftsmen. It works so well and sounds so flawless that some fans are halfway through a TAUK performance before they realize the band is an instrumental one, according to guitarist Matt Jalbert.

“When we first started to do it, we got a lot more reactions and comments like, ‘Have you thought about putting a vocalist in?’” Jalbert told The Daily Times this week. “At the time, we were still trying to find our sound, so we kept saying, ‘Maybe,’ but these days, we’ve had a lot more people come up to us after the show and say, ‘I got halfway through the show before I realized you didn’t have any words,’ or, ‘I didn’t think an instrumental band could keep my focus and take me there.’

“To us, those are the biggest compliments. We still want what we play to be a song that takes you from point A to point B to point C and still have cohesion and keep your interest, and the more we do it, the more we know kind of what works and what devices you can use to do that.”

Much of the band’s seamless fluidity can be traced back to the childhood friendships between Jalbert, bassist Charlie Dolan and keyboard player Alric “A.C.” Carter. The three boys started playing music together in middle school, and that sort of longevity lends itself to an almost telepathic sense of timing and communication on stage, he said.

“You can go and play music with other people, and it can be a great experience because it’s a language a lot of people speak, but there’s something to be said for playing with somebody for years and years and knowing what they’re going to say or do before they do it,” he said. “You become a unit. With this band, it was never about one person more than the other. We’re all trying to make a sound happen, and we all fit in and have our own part that fits into the greater goal, which is the idea of the band.”

The group continued while the guys were in college, even though each went to a different school. They all three continued to play music, however, and after getting out, they tried working with a vocalist. It didn’t work out, but the three friends kept playing together while they searched for another singer.

“We still got together to rehearse and write music and play, and then we realized that the material was standing on its own, so we decided to set up a couple of gigs and see how it went,” Jalbert said. “People seemed to respond to the songs. They didn’t seem lost, and it seemed like we were able to say or convey something without a vocalist, so we decided to just go with it, and that led us down this very organic, figuring-it-out-as-we-go-along path.”

Drummer Isaac Teel joined in 2012, completing the lineup, and last month TAUK released its second full-length album, “Collisions.” It’s a mind-bending work of hypnotic rhythms, crushing grooves and soundscapes that rise and swirl and descend like the brush strokes of painter. And as the members — and their fans — have gotten used to making music without a vocalist to anchor a song, they’ve discovered a newfound sense of freedom in the creative process, Jalbert said.

“We’ll start playing something that’s not supposed to be anything specific; it’s more about a feeling or a texture or trying to mimic what we’ve heard before,” he said. “It really is open-ended, and that’s really cool, because it leaves it up to the listener. There’s no right or wrong, and new doors open when you’re not relying on a single voice to carry the band. It opens the door to the keyboard being able to use a weird effect, or the guitar taking a melody, or whatever. It’s about using different sounds to create a song.”

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Grateful Music

Album and Photo Review – COLLISIONS Release Party

4-pictures-TAUK

An article from Grateful Music
by Randy Harris on July 31, 2014
Photos by Mike Geller

New York City quartet TAUK is the talk of the town these days. Consisting of Matt Jalbert (guitar), Charlie Dolan (bass), Alric “A.C.” Carter (keyboards, organ), and Isaac Teel (drums), three of the four members have been playing together since middle school, with the addition of Teel on drums filling in the blanks. Besides rocking festivals and venues across the U.S. and gradually building up a respectable following, dubbed “Staukers,” the band recently hit us with the brand new full-length album Collisions. The album is a follow-up to their 2013 debut Homunculus and was produced by Grammy-winner Robert Carranza (Mars Volta, Jack Johnson). This album can be generally summed up with two words: energy and emotion. Arguably the two most important qualities in a band, Tauk has brought these two aspects of music to a new level. Collisions sees TAUK at a massive launching point in their young career. The skillful fusion of sounds combined with swelling bursts of emotion, crafty, energetic build-ups and progressive song structure culminates in a strong, tightly stitched album. The opening track, “Friction,” starts off with an appropriately spacey intro, as funky bass licks and airy guitar tones lead into a simple, but tight and groovy verse, setting the tone for most of the record. While almost all of the songs tend to have similar descriptions as to the genre and sounds incorporated, the progressive structures and continuity of the album keep listeners constantly grooving the whole way through. From slower, spacey sections to upbeat, funky dance grooves, each track keeps its own identity firmly intact. The album seems to be primarily led by Matt Jalbert’s elaborate guitar work, but that is definitely not to say that the rest of the band does not play an integral role. Dolan’s bass work refuses to stay put as he winds his way up and down the neck. Carter’s versatility in all of the unique sounds and styles offered by keyboards and organs opens up the songs, and his beautifully melodic chord work blasts off the build-ups into surges of instrumental emotion. Last, but certainly not least, Teel’s strong, dynamic drumming completes the circle, demanding leadership of the band. His style speaks very loudly, keeping listeners on their feet and the band tight and unwavering. TAUK’s unmatched brand of progressive, instrumental rock-funk fusion simply demands to be noticed. The resulting live experience takes on everything that attendees in the live music scene want. It is funky, groovy and, most of all, it is impossible not to dance to. As the band continues to blow up festivals (Lockn’, Catskill Chill, Bear Creek) and venues (supporting bands such as Papadosio, The New Mastersounds, Orgone and Big Something), TAUK will continue to gain followers, and we will see much more out of the New York quartet in the very near future. Collisions was released on July 22, 2014 and is available for purchase via the band’s website and major outlets such as Amazon and iTunes.

See more photos here: http://www.gratefulmusic.com/2014/07/album-review-and-photo-review-tauk.html

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The Rock Rag

TAUK – A Zephyr of Sound

all-4 (1)

An article from TheRockRag.com
Review and Photos by Kimberly Annette July 22, 2014

TAUK’s derivative instrumental sound is a fresh intricately woven tapestry of funky beats and synthesized tonality, mixed with the eclectic purity of a well rooted guitar. Their instrumental jams are comparable to a juggernaut riding the evening zephyr through a stratosphere of sound, thoroughly fun, full, engaging and captivatingly talented.

This excitingly cool instrumental quartet who’s originality continues to be refreshing and exciting is comprised of Matt Jalbert (Guitar), Charlie Dolan (Bass), Alric “A.C.” Carter (Keyboards/Organ), and Isaac Teel (Drums).

Jalbert, Dolan and A.C. have played together since middle school so the three as you can tell by their music are tight. Add into the mix the syncopated rhythms of Teel, who joined the band in late 2011 early 2012 and the sound of TAUK awakes fully alive and ready for the world. Because the guys started together at such a young age their talent obviously shines but now with the maturity of age brings wisdom and personal depth which translates in the development of creative uniqueness for the band TAUK.

Recently TAUK made a trip to Los Angeles to finish up the recording of their new album Collisions. After the last track was mixed and finished we caught up with the guys, who had landed at The Mint for a quick gig. The Mint’s rich history in the Los Angeles music scene stems back decades and has been host to some of the coolest cats in the biz. Greats like Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles, or more recently Macy Gray and The Wallflowers, so it is easy to see why TAUK would be welcome at The Mint.

The purity of the straight instrumentals opens a door to another world, a place where cares are forgotten on a ride that is sweeping and intoxicating. The last couple songs on TAUK’s setlist that night were two favorites and as always this night was no different. When the band delved into The Beatles tune, “She’s So Heavy” it raised the bar, the guys owned it as if they had written it themselves, building to false endings and a reprise coda. With each false ending they launched back in sucking every listener in the place deeper into the powerful violence of the music. The masterful adaptation of  “She’s So Heavy” ends to the overwhelmingly loud cheers and applause of everyone in the club. But they weren’t finished yet that was just a tease as the guys led into the final song, an original off their last album Homunculus, “In the Basement of the Alamo.”

“In the Basement of the Alamo” from the beginning is a force to be reckoned with. Dolan starts the song with a hard driving funky rock bassline laying a path for the masterful synthesized keys of Carter. When Jalbert lets it all loose on his well-worn Gibson 335 Semi-Hollow body it’s a thing of beauty. All the while Teel’s snare with its rock infused rat-a-tat-tat-tat, drives the momentum as the volume crests and the music turns. The once full speed ahead drive falls into a mellow melodic mix and then back to full throttle. By the time “In the Basement of the Alamo” is completed TAUK has transported the listening observer through a colorful multi-layered geometric kaleidoscope of sound.

If you are ready for something different, something new and exciting, something solid and fun, then check out TAUK and catch a flight on an evening zephyr through the eye of a kaleidoscope and get lost in the music. Whether live or digital download find your way to the soul of TAUK’s music you won’t regret it!

Collisions is set to release today, Tuesday, July 22nd and available on iTunes. Let the ride begin.

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JamBase

Exclusive Premier | TAUK – Friction
An article from JamBase

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On July 22 NYC-based funk-prog act TAUK will release their full-length sophomore studio album, Collisions. The LP, which is which is currently available for pre-order, features the explosive, groove-heavy, instrumental rock we’ve come to expect from the immensely-talented quartet.

TAUK bassist Charlie Dolan sees Collisions as a natural progression from the band’s 2013 debut, Homunculus. “We took some of our favorite parts of that album and expanded on them with new sounds and musical flavors. Its music that makes you think, but can also make you dance,” explained Dolan. Where does the title come from? “Being an instrumental band, our music is more about stirring up a feeling rather than meaning something specific. The word Collisions lets your mind make up an image of its own. It’s a little bit open ended, but at the same time powerful,” said guitarist Matt Jalbert.

TAUK will celebrate the release of Collisions with a CD Release Show at The Knitting Factory in Brooklyn on July 19. The quartet is also set to play a number of festivals this summer including the inaugural Hudson Project, Virginia’s Floyd Fest and Pennsylvania’s Wills Mountain Festival.

Today, we’re excited to premiere the first single off of Collisions. Let’s take a look at the video for the hard-hitting prog epic “Friction”:

Here’s a list of upcoming TAUK dates:

7/9 – Baltimore, MD @ The 8×10 w/ Cory Henry of Snarky Puppy & Jordan August Band (residency)
7/11 – Saugerties, NY @ Hudson Project
7/12 – Berryville, VA @ Pasture Palooza Music & Arts Festival
7/16 – Baltimore, MD @ The 8×10 w/ ELM & Operation Friendship (residency)
7/19 – Brooklyn, NY @ The Knitting Factory (CD RELEASE SHOW)
7/23 – Baltimore, MD @ The 8×10 w/ Freedom Enterprise (residency)
7/24 – Charlotte, NC @ White Water Center
7/25-26 – Floyd, VA @ Floyd Fest
7/30 – Baltimore, MD @ The 8×10 w/ Big Something & Soohan (residency)
7/31 – Wilmington, DE @ World Café Live w/ Big Something
8/1 – Philadelphia, PA @ Grape Room w/ Big Something
8/2 – Washington, DC @ The Hamilton w/ Big Something
8/7 – Plains, PA @ River Street Jazz Café
8/8 – Bedford, PA @ Wills Mountain Festival
8/9 – Luray, VA @ Doah Fest
8/12 – Richmond, VA @ The Broadberry w/ DJ Williams Projekt

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Relix Magazine

Homunculus Connections

An article from Relix Magazine
by Grace Beehler on August 30, 2013

“Being in a band is so much more than a collective of good musicians playing through songs,” says Charlie Dolan, bassist of the New York quartet TAUK. “It’s about being a group with a single message that everyone portrays together, musically, physically and emotionally.”

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